What Res Life Means for You

What Res Life Means for You

Housing and Residential Life is committed to create environments in alignment with the University's values by facilitating purposeful opportunities for students to live, learn, work, and play, which will motivate students to serve as leaders in society.

Why you should live on campus:

Our Data shows…

Students living on-campus continue to academically out-perform their peers living off-campus:

• Residential students averaged a 3.2 GPA while off campus students averaged a 2.8.

• 16% of SFUAD students living off-campus were placed on academic probation compared with 6% of residential students.

• Of those off-campus students placed on academic probation, almost 50% are suspended by the end of the spring semester

• Residential students living on campus are almost twice more likely to graduate in four years than their off campus peers.

Learning Outcomes:

Housing and Residential Life is committed to create environments in alignment with the University’s values by facilitating purposeful opportunities for students to live, learn, work, and play, which will motivate students to serve as leaders in society. Housing and Residential Life is committed to create environments in alignment with the University’s values by facilitating purposeful opportunities for students to live, learn, work, and play, which will motivate students to serve as leaders in society. Community Involvement: Residents will understand how their actions make an impact on their community through making a commitment to service, social interactions, and civic responsibility.

  • Service: Residents will understand the positive impact they can have on society by serving as volunteers, active members, and leaders within their community.
  • Social Interactions: Residents will establish meaningful relationships with others in the Santa Fe University community by participating in hall and campus activities.
  • Civic Responsibility: Residents will examine their behaviors and how the results of those actions make an impact on others. Global Civility: Residents will explore their questions pertaining to social, cultural, and economic backgrounds and perspectives which encourage an increased understanding of the human condition.
  • Understanding similarities and differences: Residents will explore the impact that similarities and differences in background and values have on one’s perspective.
  • Tolerance: Residents will demonstrate respect for differing perspectives by living and interacting appropriately with members of their community.
  • Global Perspective: Residents will examine their interconnectedness to other societies in order to understand global perspectives.
  • Personal Development: Residents will examine their personal values, goals, and lifestyle to achieve a balanced approach to everyday life.
  • Healthy Lifestyle: Residents will correlate a connection between physical, emotional, and social well being and their success as a student.
  • Personal Identity: Residents will examine their personal values, motivations, skills, and weaknesses and how these affect the decisions they make.
  • Process of Achieving Goals: Residents will identify realistic goals and develop a plan to achieve personal and academic success.
  • Professional Development: Residents will learn and practice problem solving, self-discipline, and communication skills that promote team work and collaborative innovation.
  • Problem Solving Skills: Residents will be able to identify and critically analyze interpersonal situations and problems to develop effective solutions.
  • Communication Skills: Residents will use effective verbal and appropriate non-verbal communication skills that promote collaboration.
  • Career Development Skills: Residents will develop skills for career preparation that will serve them in becoming successful professionals.

Roommate Success

Nearly all of the students who come to SFUAD have private rooms at home. Those who do share a room with a sibling are in spaces larger than most of our double and triple rooms. Add to this formula that most students have never lived away from home, lived with a stranger or coped with the stress of a SFUAD curriculum, and the atmosphere for problems is apparent. How do we overcome this? By deliberate discussions about the basic fundamentals of social beings: asking permission, respecting the wishes of others, compromise, and sharing. Here is what we share with residents:

  • You and your roommate have most likely come to college with different values, beliefs, and customs. Differences can be exciting, but they can also offer new challenges to your interpersonal skills.
  • Building a foundation of open communication can enhance roommate success. Start by becoming acquainted with each other so you know what to expect.
  • Some of the goals of sharing a room are to create an atmosphere where both your personal and academic needs can be met, and it is always nice if a friendship can develop as well! Keep in mind that your roommate/suitemates/apartment mates are not going to be just like you. You will need to adjust and compromise.

Being a Good Roommate Means . . .

  • Talking to each other with no outside distractions
  • Not feeling like you have to be best friends
  • Keeping a good sense of humor
  • Borrowing only with permission
  • Giving studying and sleeping top priority
  • Trying to be neat
  • Taking accurate phone messages
  • Discussing potential areas of conflict
  • Being open to compromise
  • Being considerate of your roommates’ privacy
  • Being honest and assertive, and standing up for yourself
  • Filling out the roommate contract
  • Asking your RA or HD staff member for help and assistance

Roommate Contracts

Roommate contracts are utilized by our Residential Life staff are available to help facilitate community living. This is completed at the start of the academic year or anytime throughout the year. All roommates will discuss and come to an agreement on the contract. The terms of the contract must be honored. A violation of the contract may result in judicial action.

Housing’s policies on room moves

Because we start the beginning of the year at 100% occupancy, we simply have no space into which a student can be easily moved for a roommate conflict. We are prepared to help mediate a conflict and to work with all parties involved to create a livable situation. Please be sure your son or daughter keeps their RA or HD informed.